Technology

Public Health Language

"The Health Development Agency and England's Public Health Observatories (PHO's) have developed a unified Public Health Language (PHL) [formally known as the National Public Health Language] to facilitate interoperability. The first version of this language was officially launched at a conference on the 20th December 2004. The PHL is the result of integrating the former HDA's 'Public Health Information Thesaurus' with the PHOs 'Public Health Information Tagging System' (PHITS), which are no longer active as they have been superseded by the PHL.

POPLINE Keyword Guide

"The POPLINE Keyword Guide is a compilation of 2,000+ keywords used to index documents represented in the POPLINE database. Use POPLINE keywords to build more targeted searches of the more than 340,000 records contained in the POPLINE database. Familiarity with this vocabulary will make you a better POPLINE searcher. POPLINE keywords are capitalized. In addition, commonly used synonyms and closely related concepts are included to help find the most relevant POPLINE keyword for the subject you are researching.

Product Classification

"The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established classifications for approximately 1,700 different generic types of devices and grouped them into 16 medical specialties referred to as panels. Each of these generic types of devices is assigned to one of three regulatory classes based on the level of control necessary to assure the safety and effectiveness of the device."

Family Thesaurus

"Family Thesaurus is arranged in an alphabetical sequence showing the hierarchical relationship of each main term to other terms. Non-used terms or cross-references are listed to guide users to the preferred terms. Main terms are shown in bold and non-used terms in a lighter typeface. The Thesaurus facilitates post-coordinated indexing, whereby complex subjects are represented by several different headings, rather than one single heading. Post-coordinated systems rely on the use of boolean operators - such as and, or, not - to combine the separate headings for searching.

Adverse Event Reporting Ontology

"The Adverse Event Reporting Ontology (AERO) is an ontology aimed at supporting clinicians at the time of data entry, increasing quality and accuracy of reported adverse events. AERO focuses on signs reported by clinicians as part of adverse event reporting forms, whether causality to the medical intervention as been established or not. Official releases will be marked as such, and will comply with ID and deprecation policies."

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