language

Historical Thesaurus of English

"The University of Glasgow Historical Thesaurus of English was initiated by the late Professor Michael Samuels in 1965, and the first full version of the Thesaurus was completed in 2008 under the direction of Professor Christian Kay. It contains almost 800,000 words from Old English to the present day arranged into detailed hierarchies within broad conceptual categories such as Thought or Music.

Languages Name Authority List

"The Languages name authority list (NAL) or Common Authority Table (CAT) is a controlled vocabulary listing languages with their authority code and label(s) in the 24 official languages of the EU (when available).

The language code table is based on ISO 639 standard which is issued in several parts:

Multilingual Name Authority List

"The multilingual authority table is a controlled vocabulary based on the language authority table. It contains language combinations used for catalogue purposes. The EU publications use two-character codes, the first two positions of the three-character authority code.

The codes are alphanumeric in order to not confuse with ISO codes that are strictly alphabetic."

Language – Standard Classification

"The standard classification of language is a hierarchical classification of three levels. Level 1 of the classification has 24 categories, level 2 of the classification has 43 categories and level 3 has 134 categories – excluding residual categories."

"The standard classification of language is a hierarchical classification of three levels. Level 1 of the classification has 24 categories, level 2 of the classification has 43 categories and level 3 has 134 categories – excluding residual categories."

Australian Standard Classification of Languages

"All world languages are in scope of the classification. Languages with significant numbers of speakers in Australia are separately identified within the classification structure. Actively spoken Australian Indigenous languages are also separately identified. Languages which are not separately identified are included in the most appropriate residual category of the classification. Extinct or dead languages spoken for religious or academic purposes are included in the most appropriate residual category of the classification.

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